The Government’s commitment to phase out gas boilers in UK homes from 2020 promises a bright future for renewables and for heat pumps in particular. Gas is the primary source of heating in around 85% of homes in the UK at the moment, and accounts for more than a third of our emissions.  

When will gas boilers be phased out?

From 2020, gas boilers will not be installed in new-builds and alternative heat sources must be found. Gas boilers in existing properties can be used for as long as they work, but when they need to be replaced, other means of heating must be installed.  

Why are heat pumps so popular?

Used extensively throughout the United States, Canada and Europe, modern air source heat pumps (ASHPs) are proving to be a creditable renewable heating option. Although they are relatively costly to install, they are among the few technologies capable of meeting the expectations of consistent heating quality and cost-efficiency with low running costs and little maintenance required. Ground source heat pumps, probably more suited to rural environments where there’s more space between properties to allow for the accompanying pipework, are also growing in popularity.  

What are the benefits for developers?

Developers will be encouraged to embrace the change when the government’s plans to relax rules on third party ownership of renewable technologies eligible for the Renewable Heat incentive come into effect. Soon, developers will be able to ‘own’ the heat pumps they install on the properties they build and receive the RHI tariff of 10.18p/kWh for a seven-year period, thereby offsetting the cost of the installation. It appears that attractive RHI tariffs and the government’s commitment to invest in and increase the heat pump industry in the UK, means this renewable source is set for growth.  

What training do I need to become a heat pump installer?

If you are an experienced domestic heating installer looking to up-skill to include ground source or air source heat pumps in your portfolio, take a look at our Level 3 Heat Pump Systems course which covers both technologies. The four-day course meets the training entry requirements for the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS). MCS is an industry-led and nationally recognised quality assurance scheme, supported by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy, which certifies microgeneration technologies used to produce electricity and heat from renewable sources and the installers who fit them. For more information on the course and the entry requirements, please click here  
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